• SuddenDownpour@sh.itjust.works
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    10 days ago

    Giftedness easily becomes a social disability if your environment isn’t good for it. The education system isn’t ready to handle you constantly being ahead of the class? Get ready to sleep in school as the best years to take advantage of it pass by. Your topics of interest are too complex for everyone else around? Have fun enjoying your friendships less than everyone else. You don’t mask your intelligence? Here, have 10 lottery tickets to get bullied, no, you can’t return them. Congratulations, you graduated from college. Do you have the money for a masters degree? Oops, guess you studied for nothing. Got into debt and got a masters, but the job market isn’t booming? Do you have rich parents, or rich friends? Aw shucks, guess you couldn’t network your way into the type of job you would have liked.

    Being intelligent helps, if you’re patient, hard-working, and have the means to look out for the less conventional options, but not so much as one would instinctively think.

    • gibmiser@lemmy.world
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      10 days ago

      Was everything super easy for you? Congrats, you never learned how to struggle and persist and you get discouraged easily. Good luck growing your skills and knowledge now…

      • scops@reddthat.com
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        10 days ago

        Hey that’s me! I coasted through high school and got to college having no work ethic or ability to really study material that I almost, but not quite, had down. Dropped out senior year to work in IT, got fired a year later, and had to move back in with my parents for almost a year before I went back and finished my degree and got a new job.

        It was very humbling

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          10 days ago

          I coasted through elementary school and ran up against undiagnosed autism, ADHD, and GAD (it was the 80s and I wasn’t disruptive) once homework started getting real. Had no problem learning the material, aced the tests, struggled with homework and writing assignments. “Not working up to his potential” became “lazy.” I took myself out of the gifted classes in middle school and bailed on “college prep” classes in my sophomore year. By the time I graduated I had failed English three times and wanted nothing to do with college and its endless papers I’d never write. Went to tech school for IT/electronics and did field service work for a bit before getting burned out and laid off. Landed in corporate IT and got real intimate with depression. 25 years later I’m still trying to recover from a lifetime of fighting uphill on hard mode against AuDHD, anxiety, depression, trauma, and the resulting burnout, keenly aware of my shortcomings the entire time while simultaneously fostering a deep seated contempt for the orphan crushing machines that define modern life.

          My life would have been a whole lot easier if I had only been sociopathic.

          • kellyaster@lemmy.world
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            9 days ago

            It’s rare, but you ain’t alone. Man, I feel your pain. This happened to me, too, in the 80s. I was undiagnosed ADHD, which was never suspected because at the time it was just “ADD” and I wasn’t hyperactive. I had a lot of difficulty focusing, which affected my ability to learn and got me labeled – yep, how’d you guess? – “lazy” unanimously by all the adults in my life. I still got excellent grades most of the time, which just reinforced the lazy theory.

            But wait, it got worse! I hit a wall academically when we started learning more advanced stuff and I wasn’t able to brute-force my way into A’s and B’s, and so I immersed myself in art (as a way to cope, I’m now realizing in hindsight), graduated in the bottom quarter of a prestigious prep school, and graduated 5 yrs later from college with an art degree. And I didn’t know what to do with my life, so I went back! For a second art degree! And I nearly flunked out again and had to reapply and finally graduated again…jfc, this is exhausting having to recount, haha…anyway, fast forward a lot and guess what? Now I’m a programmer. Web developer, specifically.

            Never went for the CS degree. I wanted to, but I honestly thought I was stupid and utterly incapable of handling the curriculum - especially the math - so I wrote off that career path entirely. Like, I never gave myself a chance. I’m finally where I feel like I should be, but it took so long to get here, ya know? I wish I knew when I was younger that I wasn’t stupid.

            • Daefsdeda@sh.itjust.works
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              9 days ago

              Any advice for someone who just graduated but never did any real work due to the same problems (gifted but adhd). I just finished college but I just struggle so hard with the job aspect.

              • kellyaster@lemmy.world
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                9 days ago

                Sure! Note that everybody’s different, so what works for one person may not work for another. The following is based on what works for me.

                • Have you been prescribed meds? Take ‘em. If you were prescribed Adderall, Vyvanse, or their generic equivalents to address the “inattentive” type of ADHD (like me): they are classified as stimulants and you can only get a month’ s worth at a time (assuming you’re in the U.S.), so set a recurring alarm on your phone so you don’t forget to call in a refill or do it online. Put your local pharmacy’s phone number and address in your phone, and take note of other pharmacies in the area in case there’s a shortage (which is a thing nowadays). You are gonna have to advocate for yourself if they are out of stock, so get used to the idea that you may have to call and ask the pharmacy for the generic equivalent or other locations that do have it in stock. Side note: if you don’t have insurance, GoodRx might be worth a look.

                • If you get overwhelmed easily, do whatever is necessary to make yourself comfortable and eliminate distractions so you can focus. Music is good. Disabling phone notifications during work hours might help. Interruptions suck, especially if your task requires intense concentration, so don’t let them disrupt your shit.

                • Keeping track of tasks and deadlines will help you stay organized and feel more in control, so get in the habit of checking and updating your calendar (and/or task management app or text editor, whatever) every morning so you don’t get caught off guard by stuff that is already planned. I know, everyone says make a list, which is cliche and doesn’t always work for everyone, so find what works for you. Think of it as doing your future self a favor. You’ll be grateful for past you looking out for you.

                • Take a break once in a while. You might want to set an alarm for that. Step away from the computer and get some fresh air or something. Meditate or do breathing/grounding exercises if that works for you. You aren’t a machine, and you really gotta be kind to yourself and remember that you have human limits. Taking a break is crucial, especially if you are hyper-focused on something and can’t make progress; it’s just gonna frustrate you more if you force yourself to spin your wheels, so be kind to yourself. For real, sometimes allowing your brain to relax can help when you get back to the task. Sometimes things fall into place when you look at them with fresh eyes.

                Anyway. Sorry for the bigass bullet point blocks of text. I hope none of that came across as obvious, cliche, or old person condescending, but that is what works for me. It sucks that you have to deal with this and that you have to put in extra effort just to function in everyday life… believe me, I empathize with you. It can be a fuckin struggle. But the truth is, you can’t control everything, so address the things that you can control. Do your future self a favor…identify the things that mess you up and find ways to work around them. And be kind to yourself, you deserve it.

                I sincerely hope that helps. Feel free to reply with questions or vent if you need to, or DM me.

        • Shard@lemmy.world
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          10 days ago

          Tell me, master Bruce, why do we fall?

          So we can pick ourselves up.

    • flamingo_pinyata@sopuli.xyz
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      10 days ago

      Oh I feel this so much. There’s a range of jobs and environments where I do really really well. But the way most organizations are structured I can never find a place where my strengths are desirable in the long term.
      And selling myself is not one of my strengths.

      • xpinchx@lemmy.world
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        10 days ago

        Try smaller businesses maybe? Corporate isn’t for everyone.

        I got hired for two simple tasks and quickly realized the company (being small) was lacking in a lot of areas I specialize in or am passionate about. I started doing all these extra things and I got a lot of recognition and $$$ in return. I also don’t hate my job, it’s a small team and we all get along great.

      • Swedneck@discuss.tchncs.de
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        9 days ago

        absolutely one of the worst parts of having an invisible disability is having to be your own advocate, it’s so fucking exhausting having to constantly defend and promote yourself.

    • Sabata@ani.social
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      10 days ago

      Your topics of interest are too complex for everyone else around? Have fun enjoying your friendships less than everyone else.

      This never goes away, but it at least got me a job.

    • Aceticon@lemmy.world
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      10 days ago

      In my experience, the expectations of most people about “gifted” level intelligence seem to be shaped shaped by things like movies and are wholly unrealistic.

      Even a twice as fast CPU is no guarantee that the software running in it is any good or appropriate for any one task.

      • AlolanYoda@mander.xyz
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        10 days ago

        Oh! I’m in the beginning stages of learning Dutch, but there were several words I didn’t know, which made me feel extra stupid. Well done!

    • GBU_28@lemm.ee
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      10 days ago

      If your undergrad offers you zero income opportunities, you weren’t so gifted after all

  • Leate_Wonceslace@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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    I was told that when I went to college I would realize that I’m not that smart. Instead I met a bunch of people who got depressed because they weren’t as good as I was. I tried to explain to them that I was a freak who was masking so hard that I collapsed from exhaustion whenever I got home, and they shouldn’t try to compare themselves to me because the part of my brain that does logic ate the part that reads faces and understands how talking works. I wanted them to understand that there was a lot that came naturally to them that I would never be able to do easily.

    • ouRKaoS@lemmy.today
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      10 days ago

      “Gifted” in school basically just means “above average” and as we all know…

      Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.

      –George Carlin

  • Possibly linux@lemmy.zip
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    10 days ago

    “IQ” and other intelligence tests are incredibly flawed. The biggest issue is that intelligence is very hard to define. Not to mention the IQ test comes from racist origins and was used for immigration testing for a long time.

    • nelly_man@lemmy.world
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      10 days ago

      Well the origins were laudable, it’s just that it was shortly thereafter extended for racist means. Binet and Simon wanted to see if they could devise a test to measure intelligence in children, and they ultimately came up with a way to measure a child’s mental age.

      At the time, problem children who did poorly in school were assumed to be sick and sent to an asylum. They proposed that some children were just slow, but they could still be successful if they got more help. Their test was meant to identify the slow children so that they could allocate the proper resources to them.

      Later, their ideas were extended beyond the education system to try to prove racial hierarchies, and that’s where much of the controversy comes from. The other part is that the tests were meant to identify children that would struggle in school. They weren’t meant to identify geniuses or to understand people’s intelligence level outside of the classroom.

      • Possibly linux@lemmy.zip
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        10 days ago

        I think labeling kids as slow can be problematic depending on the context. We are all good at different things. If a kid needs help in math get them help but don’t treat them as inferior. If a kid has no self worth then they have no motivation to get better. Separating them from there pears is incredibly humiliating and can cause trauma.

        Anyway this is a very complex subject that goes far beyond the IQ test.

        • BlanketsWithSmallpox@lemmy.world
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          10 days ago

          Let’s not pretend verifiably ‘slow’ people with intellectual disabilities don’t exist please. Pretending these people don’t exist or acting like the severity of their symptoms aren’t absolutely something that they need help with doesn’t make these issues go away. It makes them worse. It hasn’t worked for any other issue where people didn’t want to call a spade a spade.

          It hasn’t worked for any neurodivergent people for the last 40 years where parents and society wanted to pretend everyone was the same despite people drowning and needing help for fear of being ‘different’ or oh no their brain and body work fine no medications or doctors for us thanks!

          Being different is okay. Everyone needs help in different ways. It’s shit like the above that causes these kids to think they are.

          • Possibly linux@lemmy.zip
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            9 days ago

            So just because they failed a test they now are condemned to be labeled as retarded?

            I know multiple people who were told they were retarded back when they were in public school but they all went to college and were very successful. That doesn’t mean it came easy as learning can be harder for some people. What is important is that they had the drive to push though. I also know people who are supposedly smart who are terrible at making good choices.

    • BezzelBob@lemmy.world
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      10 days ago

      We know this, the issue is until a more comprehensive test comes around, the IQ test is the best we have, also measuring general pattern recognition can be pretty useful as a “quick and sweet” measure since pattern recognition is the base for all other forms of intelligence

      • Possibly linux@lemmy.zip
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        Why do we even need such a test? It seems like you shouldn’t place people into arbitrary categories. Intelligence can’t really be defined. A test that looks for intelligence is always going to be biased and discriminatory.

        It reminds me of social scoring and even of ethnic cleansing in the worse case. People shouldn’t have there lives defined by a test.

        • BezzelBob@lemmy.world
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          10 days ago

          I can see where your coming from but i have to say, intelligence is definitely not arbitrary, it’s just very wide and can be difficult to define exactly. Kind of like consciousness, we know it exists but we can’t really place a finger on it

          Some people are 100% stupider than others and some are definitely smarter than others. I’m sure we can all agree Einstein is smarter than a hair stylist, and while yes thats an extreme example, it’s necessary to get the idea across

          The real issue of measuring intelligence (in my opinion) is that there’s so many different types of intelligence which is why the IQ test is flawed, it boils down hundreds of different spaces into a single number

            • DarkroomDoc@lemmy.sdf.org
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              10 days ago

              This is stupid. Noting that there is a bell curve of some innate talent we label intelligence is like noting there’s a bell curve on a person’s height.

              • DragonTypeWyvern@midwest.social
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                10 days ago

                Sure.

                What makes you think that the hair stylist doesn’t have a lot of “innate talent” that just never presented itself due to environment and circumstance?

                • DarkroomDoc@lemmy.sdf.org
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                  Fine. It’s not even a concession to say that people are a mix of nature and nurture. But people assume that saying there exists such bell curve for intelligence is the same thing as saying that people’s worth is on a bell curve, and no one is suggesting that (or at least I’m not).

                  It’s ok to say that there exists natural differences between people.

              • Possibly linux@lemmy.zip
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                My point was what makes a person intelligent? Einstein is a particularly interesting example as he failed school. He also had a very bad sense of style and to my knowledge was not good at cutting hair. In that respect, a good hair dresser is far superior. They are way better at being a hair dresser than Einstein.

                We all have talents. It just is a matter of finding what we love. Also it helps to we willing to learn as you can be as smart as can be but still be lazy.

                • psud@aussie.zone
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                  6 days ago

                  The reason for testing is that people on either end of the bell curve need to be educated differently to the people in the middle and to each other

            • BezzelBob@lemmy.world
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              10 days ago

              A man who single handedly created: Brownian movement, which helped prove the existence of atoms and molecules. Thequantum theory of light, which explained how light can be both particles and waves. Thespecial theory of relativity. Which explains that time and motion are relative to the observer. The link between mass and energy E = mc2, which also forms much of the basis for nuclear energy

              This man basically discovered and explained the universe’s workings before we even had the technology to prove him right

              … vs a person who makes hair look pretty

              I have to ask. What makes you think we’re all the same intelligence?

              Because if we did consider everyone the same, it would take away credit and undermine the people who discovered all these amazing accomplishments. It’s the same reason we don’t view Olympic athletes the same as college athletes, they simply aren’t the same. Removing people’s uniqueness doesn’t create equality, it just creates a depressing dystopia where everything is the sameness, nothing has character, and nothing is unique. Kind of like the beginning of Fahrenheit 451 where everything is black and white because God forbid someone has a different favorite color

              Instead we should be celebrating the fact that there are people like Einstein and inspire to be like them, and work towards that level of intelligence. Not pull them down because we aren’t on their level

      • Wirlocke@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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        9 days ago

        I imagine it’s because the attributes that IQ measure could be the same as we use to measure success.

        Effectively if your test is based on the skills needed for STEM, and the STEM fields have jobs with high pay and respect, then you’re likely to be considered “successful”. But the same person could be awful at communication, politics, the arts, and just be ignorant at large to how the world works. They may even be hyper specialized to their field but lack the flexibility in their intelligence to understand other STEM fields (I hear physicists are guilty of this).

        Another, simpler answer, could just be that already wealthy people have better access to stable education, so they were already successful in many ways.

        • ameancow@lemmy.world
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          9 days ago

          Just to continue to throw wrenches into the preconceptions, let’s not forget that a huge part of what we consider success in the modern world can be attributed to emotional intelligence as much as spatial awareness and logic.

          A lot of CEO’s and people who climb high in the world are excellent at understanding how others feel and using emotion to communicate, share and inspire people to follow. Sometimes it’s the only thing leadership figureheads even know how to do. It’s also very, very hard to manage teams effectively if you don’t have a good understanding of how people feel at different times, how best to address those feelings and an idea how to manage the emotional atmosphere in a workplace. Yes, having good logic and reasoning is massively important, but rarely alone.

          • lightnegative@lemmy.world
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            9 days ago

            Yep, I’m starting to see how useful studying psychology would have been.

            I’m 15 years into a tech career and it’s becoming increasingly obvious that the hard problems are not usually tech problems…

            • ameancow@lemmy.world
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              I don’t know, I think there’s more to be said for actual experience and someone’s attitude more than education. Having a deep understanding of psychology can only help with analyzing issues and understanding people’s motivations, but there’s still going to be a disconnect from academic understanding of a subject, and actual experience and connection with a challenging area of learning.

              Or to put it more simply, in my last job as a manager I hired two people who had psychology degrees or majors for a technical/data position on a team, hoping for the very same kind of understanding and empathy with each other that you would think an education in human psychology would provide, and those people turned out to have the most issues with others because of their own lack of real-world experiencing socializing and maintaining relationships with others.

          • vga@sopuli.xyz
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            can be attributed to emotional intelligence as much as spatial awareness and logic.

            Even though popular culture likes to equate intelligence with lack of social intelligence and even outright autism, it’s more likely that an intelligent person is intelligent in all of these things.

        • vga@sopuli.xyz
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          Have you seen IQ tests? They are not exactly “based on the skills needed for STEM”.

      • trashgirlfriend@lemmy.world
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        9 days ago

        Because it also correlates with parental wealth, better access to education, etc.

        Kids with better off parents get better school/tutoring from a young age > get better IQ scores > go on to better colleges > have better creds and connections> success.

        • vga@sopuli.xyz
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          Intelligence has a genetic component. Smart parents tend to have smart kids. It’s not the only factor certainly, and it’s not clear how big of a factor it is, but it undoubtedly plays some role in it.

          • trashgirlfriend@lemmy.world
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            I don’t doubt that there is a factor but you’re clearly overestimating how much of a factor it is.

            If two smart people have a kid and the kid grows up in poverty, they’re much less likely to grow to be “successful”.

            • vga@sopuli.xyz
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              What do you mean when you say that I’m “overestimating”? I’m asking this because I feel like you’re thinking that I’m claiming something I don’t think I’m claiming.

              • trashgirlfriend@lemmy.world
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                Well, you claimed that children of parents with higher IQ have more successful children.

                I pointed out that this is largely due to social factors, to which you replied a non sequitur about how intelligence has a genetic component.

                From that, a reasonable person would assume that you believe that genetics is a major component of IQ, and not just a small contributing factor.

                • vga@sopuli.xyz
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                  Well, you claimed that children of parents with higher IQ have more successful children.

                  That wasn’t my first claim. My first claim was that IQ predicts success.

                  I pointed out that this is largely due to social factors, to which you replied a non sequitur about how intelligence has a genetic component.

                  Then I went here because you brought up parents. So not a non-sequitur but a specific reply to your comment.

                  From that, a reasonable person would assume that you believe that genetics is a major component of IQ, and not just a small contributing factor.

                  When I specifically said it’s not clear how big of a factor it is. So no, I don’t think a reasonable person would assume that.

  • brbposting@sh.itjust.works
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    10 days ago

    Thought I read something somewhere like:

    the most common thing in the world is unapplied intelligence

    Must be butchering it pretty badly if Google’s blank

    • BezzelBob@lemmy.world
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      This is so true, the modern education system (at least here in America) was designed to create wage slaves. Raise your hand to talk, and take a piss, never teach them anything useful like taxes, laws, or banking, make them just smart enough to fill out paper work. And the sad part is that it worked

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    10 days ago

    i mean, “gifted” is basically doublespeak for “on the neurodivergence spectrum” and society just fucking hates neurodivergent people.
    It’s not really that we’re aware of our deficiencies, it’s that society makes us feel bad for things that are completely natural and should be viewed as sidegrades mostly.

    • EatATaco@lemm.ee
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      10 days ago

      I don’t follow this at all.

      My son is in the gifted program. He is also one of the most socially intelligent people I’ve ever met. Makes friends easily, is a natural leader, shows kindness and acceptance towards all people, and adults frequently comment to me how mature he is when interacting with them. He is well accepted by society and moves around in it with ease.

      I also think you’re missing the point. Are you familiar with the dunning Kruger effect? It’s the idea that smart people are better at recognizing their own shortcomings because they are smart, and less intelligent people aren’t smart enough to realize all of their shortcomings.

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        Hi! Assuming that neurodivergent people can’t be socially intelligent is kind of offensive, neurodivergence is a wide spectrum and it manifests differently for everyone.

        Also, just because someone seems good at something doesn’t mean it’s not a massive effort for them, read up about masking :)

        • EatATaco@lemm.ee
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          You made the comment that society hates neurodivergent people. It was you they implied that they can’t fit in, not me. I just pointed out that my kid is gifted (according to you, neurodivergent) and that he is also socially intelligent and fits in quite well.

      • SuddenDownpour@sh.itjust.works
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        shows kindness and acceptance towards all people, and adults frequently comment to me how mature he is when interacting with them

        None of this is rare for people on the spectrum.

        Makes friends easily, is a natural leader

        Contrary to popular belief, autistic people don’t have trouble to make friends on a vacuum, they have communication problems with non-autistic people. If your kid is on the gifted program…

        Don’t take any of this as offense. I’m autistic and I’m finding my way to thrive in life. It just would have been easier if I had been given the appropriate resources instead of being discriminated against.

        • EatATaco@lemm.ee
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          None of this is rare for people on the spectrum.

          As I said to the other poster, it’s not me who said this but them who implied it. They were the one who said society hates neurodivergent people. I’m pointing out that my supposed neurodivergent (why isn’t addressing their claim that only neurodivergent people can be gifted?) child is very socially competent and well accepted by society

          That being said, this kid is not neurodivergent. My other one, definitely. Smart and sociable, but ADHD.

          • SuddenDownpour@sh.itjust.works
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            9 days ago

            I was just mostly addressing the fact that none of the reasons for which you claim one of your kids isn’t neurodivergent is actually a valid refutation.

            • EatATaco@lemm.ee
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              9 days ago

              At no point did I say my kid is or is not neurodivergent, until this last post. The poster I was responding to was wrong either because being gifted does not mean being neurodivergent, or because being neurodivergent is not hated by society.

              • areyouevenreal@lemm.ee
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                9 days ago

                being neurodivergent is not hated by society.

                Neurodivergent people are mistreated by society though, regardless of if we are hated. Some neurodivergent people very much are looked down upon, bullied, and face massive discrimination too. It depends a lot on what kind of neurodivergence you have and how it presents to other people.

                • EatATaco@lemm.ee
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                  9 days ago

                  society just fucking hates neurodivergent people.

                  Let’s keep in mind what I was initially responding to.

      • areyouevenreal@lemm.ee
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        9 days ago

        You can be mature, well liked, and have leadership and people skills and still be a neurodivergent. Neurodivergent is a very broad category nowadays. People with things like ADHD and ASPD often end up being CEOs or self-employed. They are in fact overrepresented in those kinds of jobs. Not every neurodivergent person is socially inept or immature, to think otherwise is frankly abelism.

        Heck even I used to be considered mature and capable at one point. Could never get away from being considered weird though.

        Edit: Oh also if you look at the definitions and the way professionals use these terms being gifted is considered a form of special educational needs. Likewise you could easily make the argument that anybody who is gifted is by definition neurodivergent, as being neurodivergent just means you are outside the typical range of human neurology, which gifted people are.

        • EatATaco@lemm.ee
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          9 days ago

          The top level commenter was the one who made the comment that being gifted makes you neurodivergent and the comment that society doesn’t like neurodivergent people. I simply pointed out that my kid meets their requirement of neurodivergent and is very socially adept. I made no generalization about what neurodivergent people are or are not like, that was the other commenter.

          I wonder why it’s me you challenged and not the other poster, when your criticism is similar to my criticism of them and doesn’t really apply to anything I said (although I can see why it was inferred).

          • areyouevenreal@lemm.ee
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            9 days ago

            You are EatATaco, right?

            The top level commenter was the one who made the comment that being gifted makes you neurodivergent and the comment that society doesn’t like neurodivergent people.

            Yes and I generally don’t disagree with either of those points. Gifted people are much more likely to have things like ADHD, Autism, Anxiety, and so on. Even if this wasn’t true being gifted still counts as special educational needs at the minimum if not neurodivergent. It’s also true that society often treats neurodivergent people (even gifted ones) badly.

            I am challenging you because you essentially did the following: my son is gifted and can’t be neurodivergent because he is (proceeds to list a bunch of things that aren’t actually incompatible with neurodivergence).

            You can be liked by your peers and still be mistreated by society, those aren’t mutually exclusive. Normally it’s through things like school and work not being designed for neurodivergent people as much as it is about outright discrimination.

            Do you get me?

            • EatATaco@lemm.ee
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              9 days ago

              my son is gifted and can’t be neurodivergent because he is (proceeds to list a bunch of things that aren’t actually incompatible with neurodivergence).

              Except I didn’t say this. The other poster made the claim that gifted means neurodivergent, and the neurodivergent are rejected by society. I pointed out that my kid is gifted and socially very accepted, challenging either of their claims.

              You can be liked by your peers and still be mistreated by society

              A fair disagreement, which certainly is also not true for my kid, but I think we might be wandering into pedantic territory, but either way I certainly did not say that my son can’t be neurodivergent because he does well socially.

    • MystikIncarnate@lemmy.ca
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      9 days ago

      I see what you’re going for here, and I disagree.

      You’re saying that “gifted” refers to someone who is neurodivergent. Implying that neurodivergent people are gifted. I assert that gifted people are more likely to be neurodivergent. Not the other way around.

      Look, I know tons of people diagnosed with all sorts of neurodivergent brains who are pretty worthless when it comes to being “gifted”.

      I do however, also know plenty of gifted people who have discovered that they are in fact, neurodivergent.

      I’m just saying.

      • Swedneck@discuss.tchncs.de
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        9 days ago

        i’m not saying that neurodivergent people are “gifted”, i’m saying that the term “gifted” is a euphemism and i don’t like the term.

        It’s a way to ignore the issue of people being different and needing individualized treatment, instead saying that they’re “gifted” as if they’re just blessed by god to do better in school, which is a toxic idea.

        We shouldn’t call kids “gifted” and give them the next year’s textbook, we should recognize that it’s extremely likely they’re neurodivergent and need a diagnosis and different adjustments depending on the person. One person might just need a separate room to study in, one person might need permission to sit in the back with headphones on listening to music, one might need an extra teacher who personally helps them out.

    • ChexMax@lemmy.world
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      9 days ago

      BuT yOuR pOtEnTiAl!..

      Green region comes with a higher propensity for self “medicating” as well. Honestly makes me feel like less of a failure because I may be useless but at least I’m not an alcoholic?

      • Omniraptor@lemm.ee
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        9 days ago

        I’m useless and not an alcoholic but looking back it would have been much better for me to self medicate somehow and stay in school instead of dropping out.

  • Flying Squid@lemmy.world
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    9 days ago

    I was put in GT classes in middle school because I went to a (shitty) private elementary school where every kid went on to GT. Somehow I struggled through GT until those classes weren’t offered anymore (sophomore year of high school) and I hated every minute of it and was really bad at what they wanted me to do.

    If I could do it over again, I would beg my parents not to put me in GT classes.

    • psud@aussie.zone
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      6 days ago

      When I was a primary school kid we didn’t have gifted and talented classes. Kids who were ahead of the class could continue doing more and more advanced maths, move onto the next year’s work, though in 6th grade the problems only went up to advanced 6th grade. I don’t know what you would do if you were smart but unsatisfied with maths, I guess you’d be disruptive.

    • MehBlah@lemmy.world
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      9 days ago

      I had a guy in my class. We shared a first name and middle name. If he was going to school today he would have had a IEP. My high school guidance counselor who also created the class schedules was in a feud with my parents about some trivial thing. She knew but didn’t care she swapped my almost by name doppelgangers schedules. Poor dude got stuck in advanced classes and they stuck me in the the regular classes. I didn’t say anything since I hated the advanced classes. I had straight A’s for the first time in my life. Unfortunately at around five weeks in they decided to swap us since my parents found out and of course the teachers knew it was a ‘mistake’. I told them I wanted to stay in the regular classes but of course that simply wasn’t possible. I could have had a high grade point in high school but since they insisted I had to be in the advanced classes where maintained a B to C grade in everything except computer science and physics. I know why I sucked in all the other classes today but back then I had that ‘keen awareness of my own deficiencies’. My parents were so busy having their childish feuds that they refused to get me help for my problems.

      I wonder how many of those who would fall in the blue area represented here have some form of Executive Dysfunction or as in my case additional issues?

    • TheOakTree@lemm.ee
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      9 days ago

      What does the GT stand for? I’m unfamiliar with the acronym, as it seems schools across the nation use different terms to describe the same thing.